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Kara Conn

Kara Conn

Designer

Austin, TX

Education

  • Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Texas at Austin
  • B.S. Geography and Environmental Science, University of North Texas

Discipline

Kara Conn a recent graduate from University of Texas at Austin. Before joining the University of Texas at Austin, she completed her Bachelor of Science in Geography from the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas where she also seasonally worked at a local nursery. At UT, Kara’s chosen courses were centered around living systems, including courses on soils, wetlands, living walls, and green infrastructure. In her studio designs, Kara focused on site analysis and concept-driven design, often working towards a systems-based design for water and/or air quality. She is a ‘plants-person’ and is excited to build her ecological design knowledge at Asakura Robinson’s Austin office.

After starting her MLA, she took a summer job working with Barton Springs Nursery in Austin, where she began working with their sister residential design + build firm, Eden Garden Design. At Eden, Kara specialized in site analysis and planting design, and was able to lead design on a handful of residential projects. Outside of work, Kara sits on the Central TX ASLA Advocacy Subcommittee where she hopes to aid environmental quality efforts in Austin.

In her free time, Kara likes to play volleyball, walk her pup along the Shoal Creek Trail, and explore the Austin food scene.

Q & A

Where do you get your design inspiration from?
Natural forms at all scales. Most recently, the flow and form of rivers.

If you could work on a project anywhere in the world where would it be?
Terlingua, TX. The Chihuahuan Desert plant community is mesmerizing.

If you had a superpower to make a bigger impact on communities/ cities/ or environments what superpower would you have?
The power to engage and build without budget. Let the project and community’s needs drive cost, rather than the funding available. So much value is cut from projects because of lack of funding.