Our Team

Back to Team
Grant Huber

Grant Huber

Designer

Houston, TX

Education

  • Bachelor of Science, Landscape Architecture, Minor in Horticulture and Urban Studies, Texas Tech University

Discipline

Awards

  • 2019 Olmsted Scholar for Texas Tech University
  • Texas ASLA Merit Award - 'Following Flows'
  • EPA's Campus Rain Works Challenge - 4th Place

Grant is landscape designer originally from Austin, TX and recently a graduate from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX. He earned his Bachelor’s in Landscape Architecture, with minors in Horticulture and Community & Urban Studies. Grant served various leadership roles in the Student American Society of Landscape Architects as the Vice President, and previously as graphics coordinator/historian. Grants passions and projects focus on the juncture of complex ecological systems and the built environment. He has completed multiple studio projects around Texas, all focusing on environmental justice issues and the introduction of healthy natural systems into the urban form. These studios, along with previous internships in Austin, and research assistant positions in Lubbock have allowed Grant to gain experience in Outdoor Learning Environments, storm resiliency, green infrastructure, and commercial landscape design.

Outside of school and work, Grant enjoys exploring the city via bike, skateboard, or with his partner Kari and their dog Bubby. He is also interested in graphic design, typology, and mixed media art, including collaging, stencil making, and illustration.

 

Q&A

What’s your favorite type of community engagement activity?
My favorite type of community engagement activities are those involving active participation and outdoor fun! Whether it’s a group bike tour to highlight mobility projects or a creek clean-up, I love working to make a difference in the field and have a little movement while I’m at it.

If you could work on a project anywhere in the world where would it be?
If I could work on a project anywhere in the world, I would give a broad range of anywhere on the Mississippi River Delta. The crossroads of the petrochemical industry and agriculture of the Midwest with the incredible biodiversity and complex hydrology of Louisiana opens up fascinating possibilities for resilience and habitat interventions.

What project are you most proud of?
I am most proud of a coastal resilience project in Rockport, TX in which the city participated in workshops with my design studio to write in resilience planning strategies, and green infrastructure practices into their new code. I was able to work with a strong hurricane impacted community, learn about diverse wetland systems, and beyond the studio, share my research work and insights with my LAF Olmsted Scholar cohort in San Diego at the ASLA convention.